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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
and employment attorney and member of the u.s. commission on civil rights and that was hold aitken, former cbo director or, testified and discuss concerns and the benefits included in the legislation. this is an hour and 40 minutes. >> the committee could come to order, please. . apologize for the delay there is a great deal going on in massachusetts. i hope everybody can well secretary why napolitano will not be here. we will reschedule her testimony. she was saying and i agree of how proud we are the way law enforcement has responded. i am distressed to hear of an officer being killed and another critically wounded just as we weref all the people who injured or killed in the marathon. i see at least one person who runs marathons in the audience as my daughter and youngest son do. what should've been a joyous was otherwise. people foro thank .eing here we will go forward. the bipartisan proposal we have established a path to citizenship. the 11 million undocumented immigrants in this country. it addresses the backlog in the current immigration system that kept families apart for decades. chil
. a member of the civil rights and i'm here in my capacity. civil rights was established -- >> he needs a microphone. >> this was established in the95 to among other things examine matters related to denials of protection and race and discrimination and because immigration ofte implicates matters pertaining to national origin and discrimination, the commission over the years has regularly conducted hearings on aspects of immigration including illegal immigration. the most recent such hearing occurred dealing with the specific issue of the effect of illegal immigration on the wage and employment levels of americans, specifically black americans and the evidence produced at that hearing showed that illegal immigration a disproportionately negative effect on employment and wage levels of low skilled americans, specifically black americans. >> mr. chairman, we have a hard time hearing. if you can get that a little closer. it's important to remember that witnesses at the hearing were witnesses that spanned the ideological spectrum. despite differences to policy every witness agreed that ille
. >> brian: yes. >> but what he's saying is, let's suspend civil rights and constitutional law. >> brian: for public safety. >> in this particular case and later we'll reinstate it. now, what if someone decides to do that to brian kilmeade -- >> brian: i'm not blowing up the subway! i'm not doing -- neither is your family. >> it's not the president's determination nor senator graham's nor anyone else other than the u.s. attorney to decide how someone will be charged or will they be charged. i believe in the public safety exception. i believe in doing everything we can to get terrorists. but at the same time, i'm saying don't let the terrorists trample our rights going forward. >> brian: but at least let the hole in his neck heal in order to answer the questions. we didn't even give him a chance to answer the questions. >> i didn't say end the public safety session. i say it could go on for a month. >> brian: thank you so much. next up, a gun store offering a rifle give aways on facebook has its page mysteriously shut down is facebook shutting down free speech, too? and do you know where
across the region will never be realized if there human rights are denied or ignored. there and elsewhere, governments continue to restrict civil society. they suppress dissent, and they stifle free expression. religious minorities find themselves in prison for violating blasphemy laws. online activists are shut down for criticizing their government, or shining light on corruption, or just trying to speak out and express their views about a different future. lgbt communities are marginalized or criminalized. women and girls are being targeted through rape as a weapon of war, and being attacked for the simple act of going to scool' ging scol. these tactics are as intolerable as they are shortsighted. they hold countries back, they create instability, they divide societies, and they set off cycles of retribution. so anywhere that human rights are under threat, the united states will proudly stand up, unabashedly, and continue to promote greater freedom, greater openness and greater opportunity for all people. and that means speaking up when those rights are imperiled. it means providing sup
protect those privacy and civil liberty rights that we all cherish and what i would say is that's why it's so important that we as a people through our government make the wise investments. so where we need to have security and we need those first responders, we know we're not shortchanging them because we did something foolish by, you know, starting a war in some other part of the world and never paying for it and therefore having to come back here and say, we have to figure out ways to make cuts to programs because we need to pay for that war or those tax cuts that went to wealthy people so now it's time to pay so we're making cuts to vital programs like first responders. if we're weeze wise and make smart investments, we'll do the most we can as a democracy, as a country of freedom for its people to protect our american citizens as best possible. >> i would agree with congressman becerra, what i would just add, again, without knowing the motivation or who is responsible for this particular incident, if it were to be found that this was an attack of either domestic or foreign enemies,
on the small island of sea trout, have grown to almost civil war-like conflicts. >> the unrest in bahrain began in february 2011 as protests spread across the arab world following revolutions in tunisia and egypt. people took to the streets to demand an end to human rights violations. they also wanted a freely elected government instead of one appointed by the king. the protests were focused around pearl square, crowds pushing for a revolution. many of the protesters were women. a month later, the regime struck back with force. the crackdown was supported by bahrain's ally and neighbor, saudi arabia. riyadh sent troops to help quash the protests. tanks and helicopters cleared the square. 35 people were killed. the country is torn between iran and saudi arabia. this puts it in the front and center of the standoff between sunni and shia muslims. >> bahrain is rightly fearful of the iranians, but in my view, it makes the mistake of presenting its own shia opposition as loyal to iran. at the same time, bahrain is in actual fact no longer independent. saudi arabia has always set the limits of any re
a continent. of course, it is going to get it right most of the time. that is why successful organizations and the free market and civil society are moving in the opposite direction. consolidate,ents businesses decentralize pretty well washington insists it knows everything, or as agents rely on networks and customizable problem-solving. we cannot be surprised that washington has assumed greater control over transportation, health care, and so much else, all of those increasingly centralized systems failing at exactly the same time. conservatives should seize this opportunity not to impose our ideas on these systems, but to kraut source the solutions to the states. that the perspectives and values of each statecraft craft its own policies and see what works and see what does not work. vermont's pursuit of happiness needs its people to want more government and utah's less, then who are politicians from the other 48 states to tell them they cannot have it? would we tolerate this kind of official intolerance in any other part of american life? a pugh study last week down americans trust the s
million people spread across a continent. of course, it is going to get it right most of the time. that is why successful organizations and the free market and civil society are moving in the opposite direction. while governments consolidate, businesses decentralize pretty well. washington insists it knows everything, or as agents rely on networks and customizable problem-solving. we cannot be surprised that washington has assumed greater control over transportation, health care, and so much else, all of those increasingly centralized systems failing at exactly the same time. conservatives should seize this opportunity not to impose our ideas on these systems, but to outsource the solutions to the states, that the perspectives and values of each state craft its own policies and see what works and see what does not work. if vermont's pursuit of happiness needs its people to want more government and utah's less, then who are politicians from the other 48 states to tell them they cannot have it? would we tolerate this kind of official intolerance in any other part of american life? a
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)